Birds

Common Crane
Common Crane Grus grus on Thorne Moors, 14th June 2009 (photograph by Keith Heywood).

 

1. OVERVIEW OF RECORDING

2. GENERAL RECORDING

3. CURRENT PROJECTS

4. STUDIES AND SURVEYS

 

1. OVERVIEW OF RECORDING

1.1 GENERAL RECORDING

This comprises the general documentation of Thorne Moors ornithology. Modern recording began in 1966, and the baseline references are Thorne Moors: Birds and Man (1986) and the subsequent Supplement (1990). These are now updated by The Birds of Thorne Moors. A Guide to Literature Sources (2009) and The Birds of Thorne Moors. An Annotated Checklist (2010), published by the Thorne & Hatfield Moors Conservation Forum as THMCF Technical Reports Nos 18 and 19 respectively.

The elements of general recording comprise:

  • Blog page on Birding Site Guide  for managing data input and informing birders
  • Online annual reports summarizing assessed/vetted records as a classified list of species
  • Periodic broader summary of species status and changes
  • Documentation of major occurrences and events
  • Encouragement of personal/student studies
  • Maintenance of cumulative species checklist

The essential elements of general recording currently comprise:

    • Blog page
    • Online annual reports
    • Two THMCF Technical Reports for background and comparative information
    • Published papers and notes for specific detail

 

1.2 POPULATION SURVEYS AND SPECIES MONITORING

1.2.1 The purpose of surveillance

Population surveys on the NNR involve full surveys or replicable sampling (e.g. line transects). Both allow the evaluation of actions undertaken to maintain or enhance the breeding and other bird assemblages. However, these often have to be calibrated with wider individual species fortune. Species monitoring focuses on the occurrence and encouragement of rare or declining breeding species, but may involve other targeted species. Bird surveys and monitoring are also tools in assessing broader habitat management or change on the NNR.

1.2.2 Population surveys

Population surveys comprise the following as specialist/contract work undertaken under Natural England’s survey programme for the NNR:

      • Surveys of breeding birds
      • Year-round counts of wetland birds as part of the national Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) [WeBS is a partnership between the BTO, the RSPB and the JNCC, in association with the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust]

1.2.3 Species monitoring

Monitored species are listed below, although others may be added as appropriate. For example, the return of Common Nightingale would be monitored closely.

1.2.3.1 Nationally important species

      • Common Crane
      • European Nightjar [Thorne Moors is a Special Protection Area (European Union Birds Directive, 1979), because of the large breeding population of European Nightjars]

1.2.3.2 Other priority species

      • Marsh Harrier
      • European Stonechat

1.2.3.3 Record requirements for monitoring

For all the species listed under 1.2.3.1–1.2.3.2, every record is requested, with details of age/sex as appropriate, and locational data where possible. These records can be submitted electronically via the blog (on Birding Site Guide) or by email to Bryan Wainwright (bryanwainwright@yahoo.co.uk. Postal records should be sent to him at: Silverthorn, St Michael’s Drive, Thorne, Doncaster, DN8 5QF.

 

2. GENERAL RECORDING

2.1 RECORDING AREA

Thorne Moors is a major component of the Humberhead Peatlands National Nature Reserve. The recording area for Thorne Moors has been deliberately interpreted somewhat loosely. In addition to the moorland itself, it embraces peripheral farmland and drains, plus the whole of the area influenced by Thorne Colliery. This wide definition is largely because birds are very mobile, using a range of habitats. For bird recording, “Thorne Waste” is defined as the part of Thorne Moors within Thorne parish, but early allusions to “Thorne Waste” are probably synonymous with the whole of Thorne Moors. The remaining parish divisions are Snaith & Cowick Moor, Rawcliffe Moor, Goole Moor and Crowle Moor. Most of Thorne Moors is situated in Yorkshire, the exceptions being Crowle Moor and – since 1993 – the Yorkshire Triangle, which lie in Lincolnshire.

 

2.2 HISTORICAL OUTLINE OF RECORDING

The earliest comment on birds dates from 1586, involving Ruffs from Crowle, probably a reference to Crowle Moor or the wet pastures further east (Limbert 2008). With this exception, documentation emerges in the eighteenth century. George Stovin wrote in mid-century of “…partridge, black moor-game, ducks, geese, curliews, snipes,…” (Jackson 1882, Collier 1905-07, Limbert 1998), and D——-(1785) mentioned “…ducks, geese, and other game,…”. The first deliberate notification of a bird involves an unspecified eagle shot on Crowle Moor in 1805 (Anon. 1805). Records and accounts are more continuous from the 1820s onwards (Limbert 1988). Historically, excursions by the Yorkshire Naturalists’ Union have provided records. Local societies have also been significant, furnishing useful information. The first such excursion, by the Sheffield Field Naturalists’ Society, took place in 1865. Of special significance was the Goole Scientific Society, whose recorder for vertebrate zoology, Thomas Bunker, furnished useful records in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. It was at the instigation of the Goole society that the YNU made its first visit in 1877. On Thorne Moors, the formation of both these organizations in the 1870s provided a great stimulus to both corporate and ‘freelance’ fieldwork and associated documentation.

At a slightly later period, the Doncaster Scientific (later Naturalists’) Society undertook excursions from 1904 (D. Allen unpublished). Also relevant are the breeding records derived from the egg collection of J.H. Verhees and Geo. Bostock of Thorne. Known as the ‘Verhees Collection’, these egg sets are a major source of local data, especially Thorne Moors, in the first half of the twentieth century (Limbert 2005, 2009, 2012).

Organized modern bird recording had two independent origins in the 1960s. The first of these was linked with the production of Part One of An Outline Study of the Hatfield Chase (Bunting et al. 1969). This was associated with the first major conservation campaign for Thorne Moors, and was led by the Thorne naturalist William Bunting. It had the active participation of a number of naturalists, including J.H. and J.F. Verhees and staff from Doncaster Museum & Art Gallery. An account of the campaign was compiled by Skidmore (1970). Separately, in 1966, bird recording was initiated by two members of the Doncaster & District Ornithological Society, R.J. Rhodes and R.D. Mitchell, and they were subsequently joined by a third member, Martin Limbert. The outcome of this latter activity was centred on the publication of Limbert, Mitchell and Rhodes (1986) and Limbert (1990).

Under the auspices of the Nature Conservancy Council, annual reports had been produced for 1980-83 by the Warden, T.J. Wells. However, from 1990, annual bird reports were compiled under the NCC/English Nature by P.C. Roworth as Warden/Site Manager, together with Janet Roworth, and later by a volunteer, B.P. Wainwright. Also relevant here is an account of bird recording given by Roworth (1997). The annual reports ended in 2003. Martin Limbert then initiated the Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report (2004-08),which was succeeded ornithologically by an online bird report from 2009, but subsumed once again into a Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report from 2012 onwards. All the reports are treated as published, although the earliest were not regarded as such at the time. The reports from 1980 onwards can be freely accessed on the website Birding Site Guide (1980-2003) and from this site (2004 onwards). All reports to that for 2007 were issued in paper form. The Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report 2008 was issued simultaneously in paper form and electronically, the latter initially via the THMCF website. The subsequent reports have been issued electronically (plus paper copies for 2013), although print-outs are available on request.

Traditional methods of paper-based recording applied until 2010, when record capture was transferred to a blog site, although records by any other means are still welcomed. However, online reporting is now important as a way of managing data input and informing birders. The pre-existing vetting procedures remain in place, especially through the Yorkshire Naturalists’ Union Birds Section and the Lincolnshire Bird Club.

 

2.3 THE DESKTOP REVIEW OF BIRDS

The desktop review of all Thorne Moors vertebrates, from both general and more specialist fieldwork, resulted in two THMCF Technical Reports covering birds (Limbert & Roworth 2009, Wainwright 2010). The former examines the sources and content of ornithological and allied data, citing all known relevant references to the end of 2008, and including anything known from 2009 to complete the decade. Both published and unpublished items are presented, and the bibliography is given in a partially annotated form. It is divided into ‘Chronological list of primary data sources’ and ‘Additional references’. A final section examines the decadal output of references 1800s–2000s. The second report (Wainwright 2010) outlines ‘The changing face of Thorne Moors’ and furnishes a partly codified annotated checklist of the birds. Each species entry divided into three time bands, with emphasis on two of these, the 1990s and 2000s. There are appendices entitled ‘Other species’, ‘Notable records from January–August 2010’, ‘List of observers 1980–2010’ and ‘[Useful] Websites’. There is also an index of species. In total, 229 birds were summarized (four of them square-bracketed as vaguely reported or unconfirmed) to the end of 2009. In addition, perhaps nine additional races are included.

 

2.4 NON-ANNUAL SUMMARIES

The baseline for the documentation of the Thorne Moors avifauna is Limbert, Mitchell & Rhodes (1986). This provides a detailed account of all taxa 1966-82, together with an appendix of records covering 1 January–10 July 1983. All available historical records were also included. A Supplement later extended the coverage to the end of 1989 (Limbert 1990). Limbert (1985) includes a detailed summary of records for 1983-84. Most recently, the annotated checklist (Wainwright 2010) summarizes all known bird records 1586-2009, concentrating on the years 1990-2009. Additional records discovered retrospectively, of all dates, are also sometimes published separately (e.g. Limbert 2005, 2009). Mention should also be made of a handlist of the birds of Thorne Moors written by P.C. Roworth in the mid-1990s. Although never published, the script was kindly made available by its author as a source of data for Wainwright (2010).

Taken together, Limbert (1985), Limbert, Mitchell & Rhodes (1986), Limbert (1990), Wainwright (2010), and the annual reports outlined below, represent the primary sources of data arising from general bird recording on Thorne Moors since 1966.

 

2.5 ANNUAL REPORTS

In general, records have appeared in site, district and county bird reports. Of these, the site reports are obviously the most useful in this context. A significant volume of Thorne Moors records was included in the bird reports of the Goole & District Natural History Society (1973-76). These were followed by a similarly short series of bird reports, but specifically for Thorne Moors, from the Nature Conservancy Council. They spanned the years 1980-83. However, from 1990, Thorne Moors recording has led to an unbroken series of bird reports to the present day (see DOWNLOADS).

 

2.6 BIBLIOGRAPHY

There have been several attempts at a bibliography of Thorne Moors ornithology. The first was the ‘References’ section of Thorne Moors: Birds and Man (Limbert, Mitchell & Rhodes 1986). The Supplement to this study (Limbert 1990) added 18 references to the 75 already garnered in print, virtually all the latter being of direct local relevance. The gathering of such references continued, and a list of 107 items appeared later in the decade (Limbert & Roworth 1997). At the turn of the century, THMCF Technical Report No. 2 provided a Thorne Moors bibliography comprising 147 main items (Limbert & Roworth 2000). Based on this source, a further Technical Report (No. 18) was issued at the end of the decade (Limbert & Roworth 2009). Entitled The Birds of Thorne Moors.  A Guide to Literature Sources, it is a companion report to the Annotated Checklist (Wainwright 2010). As noted, the 2009 bibliography is divided into two sections. The first, comprising 30 items, is entitled ‘Chronological list of primary data sources’. The second, entitled ‘Additional references’, cites 244 items, only three of which are common to both sections.

 

2.7 REFERENCES

Anon. (1805) Nottingham, & Lincoln. Thursday, Oct. 31. Doncaster, Nottingham, and Lincoln Gazette, 1 November.

 

Bunting, W., M.J. D[o]lby, C. Howes & P. Skidmore (1969) An Outline Study of the Hatfield Chase the Central Electricity Generating Board Propose to Foul. [Part One]. Unpublished report.

 

Collier, C.V. (1905-07) Stovin’s Manuscript. Transactions of the East Riding Antiquarian Society 12: 23-60; 13: 197-245.

 

D———-, R. (1785) A short Account of the ancient and present State of the Morasses or Moors East and North-east of Thorne. The Gentleman’s Magazine 55: 589-590.

 

Jackson, C. (1882) The Stovin Manuscript. Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal 7: 194-238.

 

Limbert, M. (1985) Some Additional Notes on the Birds and Other Vertebrates of Thorne Moors. The Lapwing 16: 5-16.

 

Limbert, M. (1988) Early Ornithology on Thorne Moors. The Lapwing 19: 15-19.

 

Limbert, M. (1990) A Supplement to Thorne Moors: Birds and Man. Nature Conservancy Council, Wakefield.

 

Limbert, M. (1998) The Natural Harvest of Thorne Moors. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 5: 1-65.

 

Limbert, M. (2005) Birds’ Egg Collections and Local Ornithology: A Case-study. Peregrine Books, Leeds.

 

Limbert, M. (2008) Historical Breeding by Ruff Philomachus pugnax in the Lower Don Valley. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 7: 68-73.

 

Limbert, M. (2009) Miscellaneous notes on Thorne Moors ornithology. Lapwing Special Series 14: 29-36.

 

Limbert, M. (2012) Bird-related collections at Doncaster Museum & Art Gallery: a description and bibliography. Lapwing Special Series 16: 6-36.

 

Limbert, M., R.D. Mitchell & R.J. Rhodes (1986) Thorne Moors: Birds and Man. Doncaster & District Ornithological Society, Doncaster.

 

Limbert, M. & P.C. Roworth (1997) Appendix I: References to Thorne Moors ornithology 1829-1995. In: M. Limbert, A Working Bibliography of Doncaster Ornithology 1951-1995.  Lapwing Special Series 6: 62-68.

 

Limbert, M. & P.C. Roworth (2000) A Bibliography of Thorne Moors Ornithology 1829-1999. THMCF Technical Report No. 2.

 

Roworth, P.C. (1997) Site Management and Bird Recording on Thorne Moors. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 4: 75-85.

 

Skidmore, P. (1970) Fifty Years Later – Another Look at Thorne Waste. The Naturalist 95: 81-87.

 

3. CURRENT PROJECTS

3.1 LIST OF PROJECTS

Two Thorne Moors projects are referred to below. For the published results of  European Nightjar work, see section 4.2.1.

3.1.1 Common Crane

A project is underway to document the occurrence of Common Crane in the Thorne Moors area from 1970 onwards. All records are of value.

3.1.2 European Nightjar

Breeding European Nightjars are monitored annually, under contract from Natural England.

 

3.2 REFERENCES

Limbert, M. (2012) Common Cranes on Thorne Moors 1970-2008. Lapwing Special Series 16: 59.

 

Limbert, M. (in prep.) Common Cranes during 2009–14. Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report 2014.

 

Limbert, M. (in prep.) Information sources on European Nightjar. Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report 2014.

 

4. STUDIES AND SURVEYS

4.1 INTRODUCTION

From the beginning of modern recording in 1966, general recording has been summarized both periodically and annually, augmented by the documentation of specific events, occurrences etc. This includes both avian events, like the occurrence of a rarity or a notable breeding record, but also non-avian events like the results of organized excursions. In addition, surveys and studies have been undertaken and written up, as given in section 4.2. These have generally comprised population studies, species-based work and ringing activity. They include contract work and other activity, especially on behalf of Natural England (and predecessors). Ornithological information has been contributed to NNR enhancement/management projects. Other endeavour has been taken on individual initiative. Contributions have also been made to national surveys/atlases and action plans. There are two generic exclusions to section 4.2: the successive management plans for the Humberhead Peatlands NNR and its predecessors, and documentation for wind farm proposals.

 

4.2 LIST OF STUDIES AND SURVEYS

4.2.1 European Nightjar

4.2.1.1 List of sources of count data given in chronological order of counts

Limbert, M., R.D. Mitchell & R.J. Rhodes (1986) Thorne Moors: Birds and Man. Doncaster & District Ornithological Society, Doncaster. [1972 count]

Grieve, A. (editor) [1975] Goole and District Natural History Society Annual Bird Report 1974.  Goole & District Natural History Society, [Goole].

Grieve, A. (editor) [1976] Goole and District Natural History Society Annual bird Report 1975. Goole & District Natural History Society, [Goole].

Grieve, A. (editor) [1977] Goole and District Natural History Society Annual Bird Report 1976. Goole & District Natural History Society, [Goole].

Wells, T.J. [1981] Thorne Moors Bird Report 1980. Nature Conservancy Council (North West Region), [Blackrod].

Wells, T.J. [1982] Thorne Moors Bird Report 1981. Nature Conservancy Council (North West Region), [Blackrod].

Wells, T.J. [1983] Thorne Moors Report 1982. Nature Conservancy Council (North West Region), [Blackrod].

Wells, T.J. [1984] Thorne Moors Report 1983. Nature Conservancy Council (North West Region), [Blackrod].

Limbert, M. (1990) A Supplement to Thorne Moors: Birds and Man. Nature Conservancy Council, Wakefield.

Bain, C. (1991) Thorne and Hatfield Moors Ornithological Survey 1990/1991. Report produced by the RSPB (East Midlands Region) on behalf of the Thorne & Hatfield Moors Conservation Forum.

Roworth, P. (1991) Bird Records for Thorne Moors – 1990. [Nature Conservancy Council], [Wakefield].

Roworth, P. (1992) Bird Records for Thorne Moors 1991. [English Nature], [Wakefield].

Roworth, J. (1993) Bird Records for Thorne Moors 1992. [English Nature], [Wakefield].

Roworth, P. & J. Roworth (1994) Bird Records for Thorne Moors 1993. [English Nature], [Wakefield].

Roworth, P. & J. Roworth [1995] Thorne Moors Bird Records 1994. English Nature (Humber to Pennines Team), Wakefield.

Roworth, P.C. [1996] Thorne Moors Bird Report 1995. English Nature (Humber to Pennines Team), Wakefield.

Roworth, P.C. & B. Wainwright [1997] Thorne Moors Bird report and schematic list 1996. English Nature (Humber to Pennines Team), Wakefield.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [1998] Thorne Moors Bird report and systematic list 1997. English Nature (Humber to Pennines Team), Wakefield.

 

Hiner, S. [1998] Distribution of Churring Male Nightjars on the Humberhead Peatlands 1998: Thorne Moors. Unpublished report by Steve Hiner Photographic, Moorends, to English Nature.

 

Hiner, S. [1999] Distribution of Churring Male Nightjars on the Humberhead Peatlands 1999: Thorne Moors. Unpublished report by Steve Hiner Photographic, Moorends, to English Nature.

 

Hiner, S. [2000] Distribution of Churring Male Nightjars on the Humberhead Peatlands 2000: Thorne Moors. Unpublished report by Steve Hiner Photographic, Owston Ferry, to English Nature.

 

Hiner, S. [2001] Distribution of Churring Male Nightjars on the Humberhead Peatlands 2001: Thorne Moors. Unpublished report by Steve Hiner Photographic, Owston Ferry, to English Nature.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2002] Distribution of territorial male European Nightjars Caprimulgus europaeus on The Humberhead Peatlands NNR. Thorne and Crowle Moors 2002. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright, Thorne, to English Nature.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2003] Distribution of territorial male European Nightjars Caprimulgus europaeus on The Humberhead Peatlands NNR. Thorne and Crowle Moors 2003. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright, Thorne, to English Nature.

 

Wilson, R. (2004) Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2004. Humberhead Peatlands – Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors SSSI for English Nature (Humber to Pennines Team). Unpublished report by White Young Green Environmental Limited, Leeds, to English Nature. [Includes earlier data].

 

Middleton Consultancy [2005] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2005 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Consultancy, Barnsley, to English Nature.

 

Middleton Consultancy [2006] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2006 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors).  Unpublished report by Middleton Consultancy, Barnsley, to English Nature.

 

Middleton, P. [2007] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2007 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton Consultancy [2008] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2008 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton, P. [2009] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2009 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Eco Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton Eco Consultancy [2010] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2010 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Eco Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton Ecological Consultancy [2011] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2011 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Ecological Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton, P. [2012] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2012 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Ecological Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton, P. [2013] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2013 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Ecological Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton, P. [2014a] Breeding Nightjar Survey – 2014 – Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Thorne, Goole and Crowle Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Ecological Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

Middleton, P. [2014b] Report of Increased Survey Effort [2014] Humberhead Peatlands NNR, SAC, SSSi, SPA (Nightjars, Thorne Moors). Unpublished report by Middleton Ecological Consultancy, Barnsley, to Natural England.

 

4.2.1.2 Other sources of information

 

Bain, C.G. (1992a) The Thorne Birds: An Ornithological Survey of Thorne Moors 1990/91. Lincolnshire Bird Report 1991: 4–8.

 

Bain, C. (1992b) Ornithological Survey of Thorne and Hatfield Moors 1990. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 3: 19–33.

 

Berry, P.M. & N. Butt (2002) Climate change impacts on raised peatbogs: a case study from Thorne, Crowle, Goole and Hatfield Moors. English Nature Research Report No. 457.

 

Catley, G.P. (1993) Breeding European Nightjars in Lincolnshire/South Humberside. Lincolnshire Bird Report 1992: 6–10.

 

Howes, C.A. (1978) Notes on the food and feeding mechanisms of a nightjar from Thorne. The Naturalist 103: 28–29.

 

Middleton, P. (2007) 2007 Nightjar Survey of the Humberhead Peatlands National Nature  Reserve. Yorkshire Birding 16: 39–40.

 

Middleton, P. (2008) The 2008 Nightjar Survey of the Humberhead Peatlands National Nature Reserve. Yorkshire Birding 17: 104–106.

 

Middleton, P. (2009) Nightjars in Yorkshire in 2009. Yorkshire Birding 18: 99–100.

 

Oates, F. (2007) Night Bird. Yorkshire Birding 16: 41–42.

 

Palmer, P. (2002) Movements of foraging nightjars Caprimulgus europaeus at Hatfield Moor and some aspects of their ecology. Unpublished report by Philip Palmer to English Nature, Thorne.

 

Wainwright, B.P. (2010) The Birds of Thorne Moors. An Annotated Checklist. THMCF Technical Report No. 19. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Conservation Forum, Thorne.

 

4.2.2 Other species

 

Bain, C. (1991) Thorne & Hatfield Moors Ornithological Survey 1990/1991. Report of a survey produced by the RSPB East Midlands Region, Lincoln, on behalf of the Thorne & Hatfield Moors Conservation Forum.

 

Bain, C.G. (1992a) The Thorne Birds: An Ornithological Survey of Thorne Moors 1990/91. Lincolnshire Bird Report 1991: 4-8.

 

Bain, C. (1992b) Ornithological Survey of Thorne and Hatfield Moors 1990. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 3: 19-33.

 

Brown, A. (1998) Reed Bunting Survey 1998 Thorne Moors Humberhead Peatlands NNR for English Nature. Unpublished report by A. Brown to English Nature.

 

Brown, A. (2000) Reed Bunting Survey 1999 Thorne Moors Humberhead Peatlands NNR for English Nature. Unpublished report by A. Brown to English Nature.

 

Hitchcock, J. [2011] Thorne Moors Crane Watch Report 2011. Unpublished report by John Hitchcock to Natural England.

 

Hitchcock, J. [2012] Thorne Moors Crane Watch Report 2012. Unpublished report by John Hitchcock to Natural England.

 

Holliday, S.T. (1978) Barn Owl [Tyto alba] Pellets from the Goole Area. The Lapwing 11: 40-42.

 

Howes, C.A. (1975) Notes on a collection of Barn Owl pellets from Thorne. The Lapwing 8: 7-12.

 

Limbert, M. (1980) Notes on the Historical Status of Grouse Tetraonidae in South-east Yorkshire. The Lapwing 12: 9-15.

 

Limbert, M. (1987) A Summary of Records of Black Grouse in the Thorne Region. Bulletin of the Yorkshire Naturalists’ Union 8: 2-6.

 

Limbert, M. (1992) Records of Black Grouse on the Yorkshire – Lincolnshire Border. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 3: 77-86.

 

Limbert, M. (1998) The Natural Harvest of Thorne Moors. Thorne & Hatfield Moors Papers 5: 1-65. [Includes brief allusions to Black Grouse].

 

Limbert, M. (2008) Black-necked Grebes on Thorne Moors 1998-2007. Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report 2007: 18-20.

 

Limbert, M. (2012) Common Cranes on Thorne Moors 1970-2008. Lapwing Special Series 16: 59.

 

Limbert, M. (2014a) The  establishment of Black-necked Grebe. Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report 2013: 36–40.

 

Limbert, M. (2014b) Marsh Harriers 1990–2003. Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report  2013: 40–45.

 

Limbert, M. (2014c) Black-headed Gull ringing: first instalment of results. Thorne Moors Vertebrates Report 2013: 45–47.

 

Limbert, M. & P.C. Roworth (1999) Bluethroats at Thorne: An Observational Diary. Lapwing Special Series No. 8.

 

Limbert, M. & P.C. Roworth (2002) ‘White-spotted’ Bluethroats [Luscinia svecica cyanecula] Nesting and Summering in Yorkshire. Bird News 4: 22-27.

 

Roworth, P. (1992a) Common Breeding Bird Survey – Thorne Moors NNR. In: P. Roworth, Bird Records for Thorne Moors 1991. [English Nature], [Wakefield].

 

Roworth, P.C. (1992b) A common bird census on Thorne Moors National Nature Reserve, South Yorkshire – a relic cut-over raised mire. The Naturalist 117: [5]-18.

 

Roworth, P.C. & S.M. Bates (1994) A winter bird survey of abandoned peat workings on Thorne Moors 1992-93. Doncaster Bird Report 1993: 114-120.

 

Roworth, P.C. & J.M. Roworth (1994) A breeding bird survey on Thorne Moors in 1993. Doncaster Bird Report 1993: 107-113.

 

Wainwright, B.P. (1999) A Survey of Roosting Gulls on Thorne Moors in 1998. THMCF Technical Report No. 1.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2003a] A Line Transect Breeding Bird Survey on The Humberhead Peatlands NNR, Thorne Moors 2003. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright to English Nature.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2003b] Distribution of territorial male Common Nightingales on The Humberhead Peatlands NNR. Thorne and Crowle Moors 2003. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright to English Nature. [Includes information 1980-2003].

 

Wainwright, B.P. (2004) Habitat Preferences of Rufous Nightingale on Thorne Moors. THMCF Technical Report No. 11. [based on a BSc. dissertation (2002) at Bishop Burton College with the University of Lincolnshire and Humberside].

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2010] Humberhead Peatlands National Nature Reserve. Common Crane Grus grus Wardens’ Diary 2010. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright to Natural England.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2011] Humberhead Peatlands National Nature Reserve. Common Crane Grus grus Wardens’ Diary 2011. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright to Natural England.

 

Wainwright, B.P. [2013] Humberhead Peatlands: Thorne Moors Crane Diary 2013. Unpublished report by B.P. Wainwright to Natural England.